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How to get a promotion?


Job hopping can be a good way to learn new skills and get promoted fast but it is not always the best choice.

On the other side, can stay too long at one job can hold you back professionally as well?



The best solution is to find the right formula to scale your career.

Here’re some tips we gained with our years of experience.


If you are job hopping, employers can think you are not reliable and that is not a good choice to invest in you.

On the other hand, if you work at the same job for too long, new employers may assume that you are not motivated or driven to achieve. Other employers might think that you are comfortable with the familiar and not easily adapting to a new job, leadership style, or corporate culture.

Also, they can assume that you don’t have a broad set of skills

So, you need to balance your choices to demonstrate that you’ve continued to build your knowledge and that, at the same time, you are reliable and a good investment.

Long story short: get promoted twice in your current company before moving to a new one. Promotions show prospective employers that you’re willing and able to take on new responsibilities and new challenges. That you are reliable but also enterprising and looking for growth.

Of course, everyone's career path is different and median tenure at a job varies by occupation, industry, age, and gender.

So, when is the right time to ask for a promotion in your company? Well, when you feel that you have already learned everything from your actual position it is the right time to ask for a new challenge.

Here’s a list of tips that will help you face this challenge.

1. Know your worth “Before entering any talks regarding a promotion, you need to know your worth. Understanding your value to your company, and on the open job market, gives you the negotiating power you need to get a promotion.”

2. Speak Up If you want more attention for your work and promotion, you’re going to have to speak up. Assuming that the boss is taking copious notes about your work, progress and projects are not always helpful, and if you know you’re an introvert, give yourself some backup.

3. Think Company First, Individual Second Try to frame everything from the perspective of how you can best serve the company so you won’t suggest to your employer that you’re not satisfied with your current situation.

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